Review Roundup: Bonnaroo Music Festival 2010


Entertainment Weekly

It was so very hot, in fact, that your brave festival correspondent, namely me, decided to forgo the photo pits — always a good 30 degrees or so worse than the temperature outside — and just see as much music as I could. At a music festival! [Read the rest of the review...]

Festival Crashers

Your camping neighbors are a giant wildcard in the Bonnaroo experience.  Chances are they will at least be decent people, since it does take a certain attitude and dedication to attend a festival like this.  However, these people will be sleeping six feet from you for four days.  It’s not unheard of for camping neighbors to be annoyed, if not awkward, with each other by the end of the weekend. [Read the rest of the review...]

Glide Magazine

The Avett Brothers make a hell of a lot of noise for guys armed with mostly acoustic gear, but their set of literary punk-folk was gentle compared to the din of The Dead Weather. The quartet cast its imposing musical glare across the huge main field while Alison Mosshart stalked the stage like a hunting tiger and Jack White splashed buckets of sweat on the drums. [Read the rest of the review...]

Jambands.com

The penultimate act on the main stage was Zac Brown Band, a group which like Friday headliner Kings of Leon has made the rounds at the festival, moving from a café tent in 2006 to a Thursday set last year at That Tent and finally to the festival’s main stage. [Read the rest of the review...]

MTV.com

A huge draw to the festival on Saturday night was the can’t-miss double headlining bill of Stevie Wonder and Jay-Z. After entering the stage wielding a white keytar, Wonder set up a two-hour string of hits including “Higher Ground,” “Signed Sealed Delivered,” “Superstition” and “My Cherie Amour,” before dipping into a cover of Marvin Gay’s “I Heard It Through the Grapevine” during which he busted out a vocoder to add an extra dose of funk. [Read the rest of the review...]

The New York Post

Circa Survive, a punky progressive-rock band that can sound like a less gnarled version of the Mars Volta — or the Mars Volta with girl trouble — called for an unusual kind of audience participation. Anthony Green, its high-voiced lead singer, urged the crowd to throw him clothes — T-shirts, caps, anything, calling for a rain of cotton and polyester. He got a good haul. [Read the rest of the review...]

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